How to Write, How to Blog or How to Craft: An Easy Tutorial

Have you ever wanted to try your hand at writing, but didn’t know where to begin? How about blogging? Or crafting? Well, it’s all here in one super easy tutorial. Check out my newest post on the HuffPo:

Easy Tutorial: How to Write, or How to Make Paper Snowball Garlands

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photo by Turinboy

(Read now and receive two Bonus Features: How to Craft and How to Blog)

There are two easy steps to learn how to write. Simply put, one needs to: arrange a selection of words into a particular order. More to the point: select words and arrange them. Or, as I like to refer to it: S & A.

That’s it!

The most difficult thing about writing is knowing which words to select and what order to put them in. Once you’ve mastered that, writing can be quite rewarding and sometimes even enjoyable. continue reading

 

My Mourning After Piece in The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post has published a blog post of mine!! A fan favorite and funny little ditty of a tale: Writer Separation Anxiety. Readers of The Memory Box will enjoy this piece I wrote the day after I finished writing the book. Please feel free to share it, laugh out loud, like it on HuffPo or leave a comment.

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Photo credit: Quinn Dombrowski

I’m not ashamed to admit I’m afflicted with writer separation anxiety. Hopefully others, by reading this, will come forward. There’s strength in numbers. It may not plague the majority of writers, but that doesn’t make us freaks. Why do you think there are so many serial authors?

I know I should’ve been ecstatic, but when I finished writing my first novel — I was bereft. I couldn’t stop thinking about Caroline, Andy, Lilly, all my characters. We’d been together for so long. It’s not a secret that I spent more time with them than my real family. I never prepared myself for life without them. continue reading

 

THE MEMORY BOX downloaded 27,452 times in 3 days

photo by James Cridland

photo by James Cridland

 

It’s been an incredible week. In the last three days, THE MEMORY BOX Kindle edition has been downloaded 27,452 times. It’s been ranked #1 for three days consecutively in its genre on the free Kindle chart and #10 overall. To say that my expectations have been drastically exceeded, is an understatement.

Believe me, I know who’s responsible for this. You are. If I didn’t have the greatest supporters in the world: friends, and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends, who read my book and took the time to write a review and posted it to Amazon, Goodreads or Barnes and Noble, this would not have happened. I told you that reviews matter and this is proof. Some of you said, ‘I don’t know how to write a review’, ‘you don’t need mine you’ve already got 3′, or ‘who’s gonna care what I’ve got to say’. But people DO care what you have to say. In fact, go look at your review now. Even you are getting ranked!

My goal with this 3 day Amazon promotion was to gain visibility. It’s really hard for a self-published author who’s writing and designing and editing, and distributing, and negotiating, and marketing and publicizing, to have a significant impact reaching people on their own. How many people can one person reach? But, I’m not just one person anymore, because I’ve got all of you. And unbeknownst to you, you’ve had incredible success! You’ve been spreading the word in your individual way: by getting excited, sharing your enthusiasm, cheering me on, telling people about my book and writing reviews that people have read and listened to. Guess how many people listened? 27,452!!! Go you!

Thank you dear friends and friends of friends. I so appreciate you. For all of you who’ve just downloaded THE MEMORY BOX, thank you; I hope you enjoy it. And don’t forget, your reviews matter too! They’ll help reach the next 27,452 book lovers. They’ve already started showing up. Yesterday, I read a review from someone I don’t know. A person from Ohio. It made me cry. I know that doesn’t surprise many people who know me, since it takes very little to get me teary. But, the review made me choke up. To think that something I created (the very thing that caused frequent bouts of uncertainty) could have this kind of impact on someone was incredible. It really got me right there. What an amazing week. I’m gonna remember it for a long time … cause it’s going in the memory box.

The Artform of Uncertainty

photo by rromer

photo by rromer


Is it even any good at all?

I’m sure this is not the thing I should be thinking at this stage of the game. Within the last sixteen months, I’ve read hundreds of articles on ‘Marketing for the Self-Published Author’ and none of the advice said to doubt yourself moments before the release of your book. Moreover, doubting yourself publicly is most assuredly an epic fail.

But if I know anything about writers, that’s exactly what we do.

Why is it that confidence and healthy egos are wasted on athletes, politicians and surgeons? Okay, it’s not wasted on surgeons. We all want surgeons to be super-duper confident. But what about us creative types? Why is it not in our genes? Or is it the other way around? Does our roughed-up self-esteem guide us to choose the arts to torture us, I mean express ourselves?

I don’t need the kind of swagger Rambo has. I’d do fine with just a sliver. I’m a little skeptical of people at the other end of the bold-barometer anyway. But it’s my initial reaction to the overly-confident type that always surprises me. For instance, let’s say I’m in the park and I’m sharing a bench with someone I don’t know. It’s a beautiful day and I say aloud, “Wow, the sky is so blue.” And the stranger turns to me and says, “Blue? Where? You mean green, right? That’s the greenest sky I’ve ever seen! The most perfect green. The kind of green sky you only see in movies. Did you say blue?! That’s crazy.” My first reaction to this, as I sit with my mouth open, looking up at the sky and then back down at this pigment-pundit, would not be ‘what kind of smug, aggressively stupid, color-blind crazy no-holding-back impolite stranger is this?’ like maybe it should be. Instead my first thought would probably be, ‘Hmm, green? Could I have been wrong all these years?’

Maybe the very fact that the arts are subjective and open to interpretation and judgment is the very reason artists fear they may not be understood or appreciated. After all, a stock trader has either a winning day or a losing day, a sharp shooter makes his target or doesn’t. There’s no judgment there. If someone hits a homerun in the extra innings of a nail-biter, no one is gonna say it was a lousy homerun.

But a song or a painting or a book or a dance. There will be plenty of interpretations and accolades and criticisms. Everyone will have a unique opinion. I will see something you don’t; you’ll be moved by something that I’ve already forgotten. Art speaks to our personal experiences, whether they are dreams or fears, accomplishments or vulnerabilities. It has the power to bring people together, to heal, to inspire, to stir, to challenge, to shock, to intrigue, to entertain.

Oh, yeah.

I can do that.